Supporting Others

Resources

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA)

Disaster Distress Helpline – 1-800-985-5990

Resilience & Stress Management resource collection here


How to encourage someone to reach out for help
How to encourage your teen to talk about their mental health


Warning Signs of Trauma Related Stress

Individuals who have experienced a traumatic event oftentimes suffer psychological stress related to the incident. In most instances, these are normal reactions to abnormal situations. Individuals who feel they are unable to regain control of their lives, or who experience the following symptoms for more than a month, should consider seeking outside professional mental health assistance.

The American Red Cross is now working with mental health professionals trained in trauma. For information or a referral, contact the local American Red Cross chapter or the American Psychological Association at 202/336-5800.

  • Recurring thoughts or nightmares about the event.

  • Having trouble sleeping or changes in appetite.
  • Experiencing anxiety and fear, especially when exposed to events or situations reminiscent of the trauma.
  • Being on edge, being easily startled or becoming overly alert.
  • Feeling depressed, sad and having low energy.
  • Experiencing memory problems including difficulty in remembering aspects of the trauma.
  • Feeling "scattered" and unable to focus on work or daily activities. Having difficulty making decisions.
  • Feeling irritable, easily agitated, or angry and resentful.
  • Feeling emotionally "numb", withdrawn, disconnected or different from others.
  • Spontaneously crying, feeling a sense of despair and hopelessness.
  • Feeling extremely protective of, or fearful for, the safety of loved ones.
  • Not being able to face certain aspects of the trauma, and avoiding activities, places, or even people that remind you of the event.

APA gratefully acknowledges Richard Tanenbaurn Ph.D, Deborah DeWolfe Ph.D, & Anne Marie Albano, Ph.D, for their contributions to this fact sheet.


Suicide Warning Signs

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Something to look out for when concerned that a person may be suicidal is a change in behavior or the presence of entirely new behaviors. This is of sharpest concern if the new or changed behavior is related to a painful event, loss, or change. Most people who take their lives exhibit one or more warning signs, either through what they say or what they do.

Talk - If a person talks about:

  • Being a burden to others
  • Feeling trapped
  • Experiencing unbearable pain
  • Having no reason to live
  • Killing themselves
Behavior - Specific things to look out for include:

  • Increased use of alcohol or drugs
  • Looking for a way to kill themselves, such as searching online for materials or means
  • Acting recklessly
  • Withdrawing from activities
  • Isolating from family and friends
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Visiting or calling people to say goodbye
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Aggression
Mood - People who are considering suicide often display one or more of the following moods:

  • Depression
  • Loss of interest
  • Rage
  • Irritability
  • Humiliation
  • Anxiety

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